Accommodation Theory is Questionable

The Accommodation theory is questionable because those tend, consciously or subconsciously, to find identification with other people through language. Actually, the most trivial facets of speech and pronunciation may take on crucial importance, and listeners frequently identify slight variations and afford them social significance. An individual’s speaking style might change because of a variety of variables. For instance, when talking to some nonnative speaker or perhaps a child, a person might speak more gradually or use grammatically simple language.

Accommodation theory, also known as accommodative process, tries to take into account the various ways that loudspeakers may manipulate language to keep integrity, distance, or identity by subconsciously modifying their language choice, tone, or speech rate to converge or diverge with others’ behavior. Although accommodation theory is recognized as a sociolinguistic theory, it’s been used in various settings, including speaking in public, songwriting, radio broadcasting, courtroom proceedings, and human-computer interaction.

The fundamental type of accommodation concerns communicators’ efforts to create themselves more like the target to be able to improve communication. Additionally, accommodation theory is due to how individuals adjust their behaviors to each other, with the idea to be alike in order to embellish their variations. Within an L2 (second language) learning atmosphere, accommodation happens in a multitude of communication behaviors, including accent, rate, loudness, vocabulary, grammar, register, and so forth.

British foreign language learners (ELLs) may demonstrate accommodation to other people although not be familiar with their very own behavior. Individuals change their speech patterns in a variety of interactions with regards to demonstrating they agree to your partner within the interaction. In L2 teaching according to accommodation theory, teachers of ELLs make whatever accommodations might be necessary. This component may also be known as culturally compatible instruction.

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